Black bear that attacked woman in Leavenworth ‘lethally removed’



The woman let her dog out when she was charged by an adult female black bear and received non-life-threatening injuries, according to WDFW.

SEATTLE — The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) “lethally removed” an adult black bear after a woman was reportedly attacked Saturday morning.

WDFW said the woman was attacked at a residence adjacent to Enchantment Park and Blackbird Island in Leavenworth at around 7 a.m. The woman let her dog out when she was charged by an adult female black bear and received non-life-threatening injuries, according to WDFW.

Wildlife officials “lethally removed” the bear near where the attack occurred later Saturday morning. Two cubs, approximately nine months old, were captured and transported to a PAWS wildlife rehabilitation facility. 

“We are extremely thankful that the victim is receiving medical care from this unfortunate encounter,” said Captain Mike Jewell. “Public safety is our priority; our officers and staff were quick to mobilize to locate the animal and secure the scene.”

The woman is currently receiving medical care at a Wenatchee hospital. 

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The only recorded fatal black bear attack in Washington state was reported in 1974, according to WDFW.

Bears typically avoid interactions with humans, but in case of an encounter with a black bear, WDFW recommends the following: 

  • Stop, remain calm and assess the situation. If the bear seems unaware of you, move away quietly when it’s not looking in your direction. Watch the animal as you back away, looking for changes in behavior. 
  • If a bear walks toward you, stand up, wave your hands above your head and talk to the bear in a low voice. 
  • Don’t throw anything at the bear. The bear could interpret this as a threat or a challenge. 
  • If you can’t safely move away or a bear continues to walk toward you, scare it away by clapping your hands, stomping your feet, yelling and staring the animal in the eyes. If you are in a group, stand shoulder to shoulder and raise and wave your arms to appear intimidating. If the bear continues, become more aggressive in your response. Use bear spray if available. 
  • Do not run from the bear. Bears can run up to 35 miles per hour, and running may trigger an attack. Climbing a tree is not recommended if running from an aggressive black bear. Black bears are adept climbers and may follow you up.



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